diversityinya:

Although Diversity in YA focuses on young adult books, we couldn’t help but notice the great diverse middle grade titles out this year, so we decided to spend a full month focused on these books! October 2014 is Middle Grade Month here at DiYA and to kick it off we’re giving away 15 books from…

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spilledinkc:

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October 1 marked the beginning of Domestic Violence Awareness month.

We define domestic violence as a pattern of abusive behavior in any relationship that is used by one partner to gain or maintain power and control over another intimate partner. Domestic violence can be physical, sexual,…

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richincolor:

Have you heard about National Hispanic Heritage Month? It is from September 15 to October 15 and is for “celebrating the histories, cultures and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America.” You can learn more about the month here.

Last year we made a book list for National Hispanic Heritage Month, and we decided to do so again. Here’s a selection of some of our—and our followers’—favorite YA books by Hispanic/Latin@ authors and/or starring Hispanic/Latin@ characters. Reblog or comment with your favorites!

(Pssst, if you don’t already know about Latin@s in Kid Lit, now would be a great time to check them out!)

  • Caminar by Skila Brown
  • Death, Dickinson, and the Demented Life of Frenchie Garcia by Jenny Torres Sanchez
  • Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan
  • Jumped In by Patrick Flores-Scott
  • The Living by Matt de la Peña
  • Pig Park by Claudia Guadalupe Martínez
  • The Secret Side of Empty by Maria E. Andreu
  • Summer of the Mariposas by Guadalupe Garcia McCall
  • What Can(t) Wait by Ashley Hope Perez
  • The Witches of Ruidoso by Jon Sandoval

You can learn more about these books over at Rich in Color!

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I’m so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers.
L. M. Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables  (via 13thmoon)

(Source: vintageborn)

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bookriot:

We asked readers to share their favorite assigned reading. We tabulated the data and have your top 25 favorite books that you’ve been assigned to read.
Then we took it one step further and looked at where those favorite assigned titles overlapped with favorite books, most hated books, and the books you were most likely to pretend to have read.
Delicious, delicious data.

bookriot:

We asked readers to share their favorite assigned reading. We tabulated the data and have your top 25 favorite books that you’ve been assigned to read.

Then we took it one step further and looked at where those favorite assigned titles overlapped with favorite books, most hated books, and the books you were most likely to pretend to have read.

Delicious, delicious data.

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effiestrinkets:

The symbol of the revolution. The Mockingjay.

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cindymayweather:

“I am so excited to be living one of my dreams – to be here on Sesame Street. I’m here because I am teaching everybody on Sesame Street the importance and the power of ‘yet.’ Never, ever, ever give up because there’s so much power in ‘yet.’” - JMonáe

Sesame Street: Janelle Monáe - Power of Yet [x]

Happy Monday, Tigers! Let’s make it a great week.

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diversityinya:

“I spent a lot of time thinking that my being Hispanic was something I had to get past in order to be successful. Sure, I was Cuban. I spoke Spanish. But it mattered more that I could shine academically. My roots were something that I kept completely separate from my idea of what success was going to be. And that’s sad. Because what I had found in life is that my culture and my roots were so entwined with my success.
I want to bring to kids this notion that who they are, the language of their families, whoever their families were in their home country, whether humble people, big-shot people—everybody’s story has value. I don’t want anybody to feel like they have to be embarrassed by their cultural heritage or it’s something that they have to get past in order to make it in this country.
They’re exactly enough. Who they are is exactly enough.”
— Author Meg Medina, “Telling the Story of You” (NEA Arts Magazine)

diversityinya:

I spent a lot of time thinking that my being Hispanic was something I had to get past in order to be successful. Sure, I was Cuban. I spoke Spanish. But it mattered more that I could shine academically. My roots were something that I kept completely separate from my idea of what success was going to be. And that’s sad. Because what I had found in life is that my culture and my roots were so entwined with my success.

I want to bring to kids this notion that who they are, the language of their families, whoever their families were in their home country, whether humble people, big-shot people—everybody’s story has value. I don’t want anybody to feel like they have to be embarrassed by their cultural heritage or it’s something that they have to get past in order to make it in this country.

They’re exactly enough. Who they are is exactly enough.”

Author Meg Medina, “Telling the Story of You” (NEA Arts Magazine)

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Let children read whatever they want and then talk about it with them. If parents and kids can talk together, we won’t have as much censorship because we won’t have as much fear.
Judy Blume (via thelifeguardlibrarian)

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